University of Pennsylvania Health System

Penn Gastroenterology Q&As

Thursday, November 15, 2012

How can I alleviate the side affects caused by my medications and coffee?

Question: I have developed an intolerance to coffee on an empty stomach in the past few years. It makes me nauseous. More recently, I started having heartburn so I began taking Prevacid®, 15 mg/day. Then I took Bactrim® DS for a urinary tract infection, and was nauseous for two days. Since then I have been experiencing mild nausea sometimes at the end of a meal. It only lasts a few minutes or so. This is accompanied by excessive salivation. How can I alleviate these symptoms?

Answer: You may want to increase the Prevacid® 15 mg to twice a day, once in the morning and once in the evening. Avoid coffee, tea and alcohol (if applicable). Sometimes, the Bactrim® can cause nausea and that should subside soon.

It is best to see an internist or gastroenterologist to thoroughly evaluate these concerns and recommend a course of treatment. To schedule a consultation with a Penn physician, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online

Is bleeding following a small intestine dissection normal?

Question: I had a small intestine dissection (in two areas) due to a complication with a laparotic partial hysterectomy for fibroids. As a result of this dissection, I am bleeding in a very light flow that is pink and not red. How long can I expect to bleed?

Answer: It is best to see a general surgeon to evaluate these concerns.  Dr. Daniel Dempsey is available for appointments at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine.  To schedule a consultation with Dr. Dempsey or another Penn gastrointestinal surgeon, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online.

How effective are 6-MP and biologics in maintaining Crohn’s remission?

Question: How effective are 6-MP and biologics in maintaining Crohn's remission? Are the benefits worth the risks? Which drug is most effective?

Answer: 6-MP and the biologics can be very effective in the remission of Crohn's disease. However, there are a number of factors to consider: extent of disease, severity of disease, duration of disease, complications from disease, past response to steroids, and nutritional status amongst other factors.

It is best to see an internist or gastroenterologist to evaluate these concerns.  Dr. Farzana Rashid is available for appointments at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center and at Penn Medicine Radnor. To schedule a consultation with Dr. Rashid or another Penn gastroenterologist, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online.