University of Pennsylvania Health System

Penn Gastroenterology Q&As

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Is frequent belching as sign of GI issues?

Question: My 13 year-old son has been burping up recently eaten food in liquid form. He says it happens ten to twenty times a day and it's not particularly acidic. He said it just tastes like the food he just ate. Should I be worried?

Answer: Belching is usually a minor symptom, but if it doesn’t go away or if you also have other symptoms, it is best to call a health care provider. I recommend that your son see a pediatric gastroenterologist to make sure he doesn't have gastroparesis. To schedule a consultation with a Penn physician, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online.

Monday, January 7, 2013

Who can treat achalasia?

Question: I was just diagnosed with achalasia. Is there a gastroenterologist at Penn Medicine who specializes in achalasia? I would like a doctor to review my manometry.

Answer: Gary Falk, MD, MS, is available for appointments at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine.  He is a Professor of Medicine specializing in Gastroenterology and Co-Director of the Esophageal and Swallowing Disorders Center at Penn Medicine. To schedule a consultation with Dr. Falk or another Penn physician, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online.


Who can treat intestinal metaplasia?

Question: Where can I find a specialist in intestinal metaplasia? I am 33 years-old and I was diagnosed after an endoscopy.

Answer: It would be best to see a physician at Penn Gastroenterology. Gary Falk, MD, MS, is available for appointments at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine. He is a national expert on intestinal metaplasia in the esophagus.  To schedule a consultation with Dr. Falk or another Penn physician, please call 800-789-PENN (7366) or request an appointment online.